The French Lebel

Meanwhile, the British Lee Enfield was a rival o the Mauser model which was a 0. 303-inch rifle. Units if these kinds of rifles were issues among British soldiers in the Western front. Its reliability caused it to still be used during the Second World War. The French Lebel was guilty of a major flaw in its design. There was a tubular magazine right under the rifle’s barrel which caused the loading time to take longer. Tanks Tanks can be traced back to the 18th century and could be attributed to a single man who discovered it.

The first tank intended for “combat purposes” was introduced on January 1916 as the British army experimented on its feasibility to be used in during wars. Then Minister of Munitions, Lloyd George ordered for the immediate production of “combat tanks” dubbed as the heavy Mark I model (Duffy, 2004). Cognizant that the British army was undergoing on its experimentation over tanks, the French army proceeded with their independent designs. On September 15, 1916, there were 49 British models that were used during the Battle of the Somme.

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Among the 49 units of the Mark 1 models that were sent to the battlefield, only 32 were successful as “combat tanks. ” The models had setback but managed to drive right even while obstructed by barbed wires and were able to cross craters even if it measures nine feet (Biddle, 2006). The attempt of the French troops to design their own models became not too successful. Their first model, the Char Schneider had a poor mobility and became unreliable during combats. Of the 400 that were manufactured by the French troops, only 100 were actually functional.

Another attempt was the Char St Chamond model became better than the previous model, but then, the tank remained unreliable due to its huge suspended body. After that, there was the FT-17 also called the Peugot model conceptualized by Renault. The tank was able to climb tracks and was the first tank which had a top-mounted steeple which could rotate (Pope, 1995) Aircraft The aircraft technology was first to be considered as of little use during the war and was initially used to map the enemy on land and eventually served as a weapon by itself. Thus there were “air-to-air combats. ” (Pope, 1995).

The first aerial bombing happened on January 19, 1915 as two Germans dropped twenty four highly explosive bombs on King’s Lynn, Sheringham, and Great Yarmouth, and to some other villages. There were four people killed and some others were injured. But the amount of the damage reached up to ? 7, 740. Another aerial bombing happened the same year in which 37 tons of bombs killed at least 180 people and injured 455 others. Meanwhile, in 1916, London was accidentally dropped with bombs. In 1916, there were an estimated 120 tons of bombs that were dropped which killed 293 people and injured 691 people (Graham, 2004).

The use of aircrafts changed the usual and traditional battles on the “battlefields. ” It marked the development of the weaponry during the World War 1 as the concept of “air-to-air combats” was introduced. It manifested a more advanced war weaponry that was became an advantage of those who had the means to acquire such. Conclusion Despite the casualties and the collateral damages during the First World War, it cannot be denied that the advances in the weaponry during the First World War introduced a milestone to the worlds’ history. The innovations that came out during the First World War were even adopted up to today.

The innovations in the weaponry that was discovered during that time were passed from one generation to another. Today, those weapons are also used by the military not just for war to kill people but to defend the people as well. No doubt, the World War I total inventions have brought has development.

References: “The Infantry”. 2006. April 5 2007. <http://www. army. mod. uk/infantry/regts/the_rifles>. Biddle, Tami Davis. “Dew of Death: The Strory of Lewisite, America’s World War I Weapon of Mass. ” American Historical Review October 2006