Roman Empire

History of cremation has it when Christianity became the official religion of the Roman Empire burial was the only method of disposition throughout Europe. This means that what determines the decision not to practice cremation was a function of religion of the Roman since historically before Christianity they were doing cremation. The Roman people were not talking of emotional healing as reason to practice burial. It would seem that concept of emotional healing came lately long after cremation has been practiced before.

It could not be argued similarly that emotional healing was less then during the Roman Empire when they were doing cremation before Christianity. It could thus be inferred that practices has their greater effect on beliefs of people than what science may seem to indicate. This argument is of course based on premise that psychology, which supports the concepts of emotional healing from the funeral ritual, is a science.

History of cremation has it that an Italian , Professor Brunetti , developed the first cremation chamber in the 1870’s which might have created a movement toward cremation in Europe and North America and which has continued to present day. If one goes back in history, the Romans had already practiced cremations before so that the development of the first cremation chamber in the 1870’s was also an attempt to bring back the old practice.

Another proof of this assertion is the fact that in 1886 the Roman Catholic church officially banned cremations excommunicating those who would arrange them. This means that prior to banning by the Church cremations were already practiced widely in Rome. IV Education, training and experience A. Life-long learning In evaluating the separate cultures in terms of life long learning, Taylor (2001) said that “lifelong learning” has been a key concept of adult education in Western Europe starting in the 1980s.

The author made mentioned of its significance, which has been put in numerous reports and commissions. Based on this life long learning is valued in the West and such values may not be as evident in the East. Taylor (2001) explained that lifelong learning has been the reference point for policy makers, and this was manifestly clear in post compulsory education and training throughout Western Europe during the 1990s. What could be proofs that life long learning is not as prevalent in the East?

The best proof is the realization that people in the East have their studies in the best universities of the West. This speaks of desire on the part of the eastern people to value life long learning which their governments in the East may not yet ready to support in their educational systems. In relating the attitude to dead loved to life long learning it could be posited that Western culture would have a better understanding of events that came along the lives of people by their strong desire for life long learning.

It could be learning is the best anti-dote to ignorance. Perhaps it could be also be posited that the prevalence of individualism in Western culture may be supporting their more advance attitude moving toward a more liberal beliefs and practice on cremations. However, it would seem that an objection would be posed by those who practice Buddhism rites in the East especially the Japanese who carries their cremations more often